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I often wondered what was in the water but could never find anybody to ask.""Helen Wagstaff lived at No.6 South Ocky, and I lived at No.4.

Our our houses were back-to-back and our mothers used to communicate through the pantry wall.

I've checked the trade directory for 1950-51 and found Dobbie & Co, seedsmen, nurserymen and florists listed with an address in Portobello Road, at 48 Moira Terrace.

But that's quite close to Portobello and a long way from Regent Road Park."The Dough School was a fond name given to the Edinburgh College of Domestic Science which was at 1-4 Atholl Crescent, until it moved to Clermiston in the late-1960s and changed its name to Queen Margaret College."When it was completed, top soil was added and grass seed sown and trees were planted around the sides.

Characteristically, each flat originally had 4 rooms, a separate external toilet and a garden.

Colony houses were built as double flats, upper and lower, with the upper flat's front door on the opposite side to the lower flat's front door, allowing each flat to have a front garden.""The 'Corrie Woods' at Corstorphine were great for adventures - no parental or adult supervision, so you could make fires and boil water for tea and climb trees and play soldiers or cowboys and indians."In his poem, 'Fitbaw in the Street' written when he was a student in 1926, Robert Gairloch described boys, dodging away from the Police, going via Cockie Dudgeons, the Sandies and the Coup on their way to Puddocky." we werent guddling for minnows, sticklebacks or tadpoles, wed be building a makeshift dam ourselves, then using improvised rafts to cross the water.

Comments above refer to 'The Puddocky as being at Warriston, close to Logie Green Road and the B&Q store (formerly 'Dodge City') but the comment below places it further to the west, near Stockbridge Colonies."In his poem, 'Fitbaw in the Street' written when he was a student in 1926, Robert Gairloch described boys, dodging away from the Police, going via Cockie Dudgeons, the Sandies and the Coup on their way to Puddocky.

I remember when a whole fleet of dockers - seemed like hundreds - used come cycling up it at teatime on their way home from work.

On a recent visit to the garden centre, I noticed a picture of a Dobbies building.

I did not recognise it, but the address was Edinburgh 7.

It's a very steep hill leading from Pier Road up to the West Cliff area where some of the town's "Someone mentioned a bonfire (a bonny, in the vernacular).

These events took place in a bit of wasteland known as 'The Lane'.

We kids would have great fun down the Dam in late spring or early summer: if we werent guddling for minnows, sticklebacks or tadpoles, wed be building a makeshift dam ourselves, then using improvised rafts to cross the water.

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