Dating site headline one line phrases


“A pretentious way of saying ‘selected.’ It’s enormously overused.” – Kristi Hoerauf, San Francisco, Calif. K., ‘takeaway’ food is known as ‘to go’ here in the Colonies. “Purely with reference to a specific teams’ fans, this word needs to go. “Let’s just keep with ‘shake yer booty’ — no need to ‘twerk’ it! “Come on down, we’re havin’ car-ageddon, wine-ageddon, budget-ageddon, a sale-ageddon, flower-ageddon, and so-on-and-so-forth-ageddon!“A horrible word that conflates the real meaning of friendship with usually hidden motivations to get at the other person’s pockets.” – Mary Been, Sidnaw, Mich. It’s the following of a sports franchise, not a group seeking independence, recognition and legitimacy; Not even if it’s the Cubs.” – Tim Wilcox, Sault Ste. Canada “Although a devout Wisconsin sports fan, I do not belong to Packer-Nation, Badger-Nation, Phoenix-Nation, or Brewer-Nation. “Both politics and sports teams have overused this n-word to describe their fans or viewers.” – Ken Hornack, Ormond Beach, Fla. “Myselfie disparages the word because it’s too selfie-serving. Hi ho, hi ho, it’s away with twerk we must go.” – Michael, Haslett, Mich. says he responds, “T’werk,” when asked where he is headed on Monday mornings. None of these appear in the Book of Revelations.” – Michael, Haslett, Mich.

“Continually referred to as ‘the so-called fiscal cliff,’ followed by a definition. “Fiscal cliff, fiscal update, fiscal austerity…whatever happened to ‘economic’ updates? “Makes me want to throw someone over a real cliff,” Donna, Johnstown, NY “If only those who utter these words would take a giant leap off of it.” Joann Eschenburg, Clinton Twp., Mich.

1171, which says, “Although the ‘price point’ of effective new drugs…may initially be out of reach for many patients…” “It has no ‘point.’ It is just a ‘price.’” – Guy Michael, Cherry Hill, N. “Usually used in a sentence explaining the ‘secret’ in excruciating public detail. “Whether it’s a ‘free gift’ (banished in 1988) or droopy clothing, this word is neither useful nor fancy.” – Jeff Drake, Saint Albans, West Va.

Is this a metaphor for business success based on the fast food industry? “It has become too frequent in business discussions. “An annoying bit of hyperbole about the latest saucy picture or controversy that is already becoming trite.” – Tim Bednall, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia “Meaning a post or video or whatever will have so much Internet traffic that it will ‘break the internet.’ It’s being used for every headline and video. “I hope the list doesn’t ‘break the internet.’ (How else would I read it next year)? “It seems as if every politician who makes a statement has to ‘walk it back,’ meaning retract the statement, or explain it in laborious detail to the extent that the statement no longer has any validity or meaning once it has been ‘walked back.’” – Max Hill, Killeen, Tex. Kenneth Ross of Glastonbury, Conn., and Bob Priddy of Jefferson City, Mo., were among many who saw this storming in last January. “The word has become so overused that it is not ‘swag’ to not use the word ‘swag.'” – Devin, Farwell, Mich.

” “Because President Obama’s signature healthcare law is actually called the Affordable Care Act.

The term has been clearly overused and overblown by the media and by members of Congress.” – Ben of New Jersey “What more can I say? “Facing adversity is working 50 hours a week and still struggling to feed your kids.

Nearly all who nominated it found a way to use it in their entries, so we wonder if they’re really willing to let go. “It’s #obnoxious #ridiculous #annoying and I wish it would disappear.” – Jen, Sault Ste. It received nearly as many nominations as “selfie” and “twerk” from coast to coast in the U. It is an insult to the millions of dads who are the primary caregivers for their children. Used by members of each political party when describing members of the other.

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